Zimbabwe

Pray for Africa

Prayer Points

  • For increased health care and preventative education for this HIV/AIDS ravaged nation.
  • For the new leadership to work for the benefit of the nation
  • For unity, cooperation, and additional resources for Christian care organizations.
  • For a moral, visionary government to rebuild this impoverished nation of Zimbabwe.
  • That all churches might face up to the challenges of the pandemic for their ministry.
  • That pastors would lead the way in endorsing helpful initiatives.

LOCATION
Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia

POPULATION
16 337 760 (2017 est.)

RELIGION
Protestant 82.7% (includes Apostolic 41.8%, Pentecostal 25.2%, other 15.7%)

Roman Catholic 6.7%

Other Christian 4.6%

Traditional religion 0.6%

Muslim 0.4%

Other 0.1%

None 4.9%  (2015 est.)

INTERNET USERS
6 721 947  (2017)

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE
95%  (2009 est.)

MISSIONARIES (2010)
Sent: 440
Received: 3 000

LEAST REACHED PEOPLE GROUPS
2

KEY CITY

Harare

Population of city:

1 542 813

Urbanization Rate:

2.3% annual rate of change (2010-15 est.)

Major religion in city:

Christianity

We Pray...

Lord, as we pray for Zimbabwe, we pray for increased health care and preventative education for this HIV/AIDS ravaged nation. Father, we pray for unity, cooperation, and additional resources for Christian care organizations.

We also pray for a moral, visionary government to rebuild this impoverished nation of Zimbabwe.

Lord, we pray that all churches might face up to the moral, spiritual and economic implications of the pandemic for their ministry, and that pastors would lead the way in endorsing helpful initiatives, holy and transparent lifestyles and loving compassion for those afflicted. We pray this in the mighty name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

State of the Church

As in most countries in Africa many people mix Christianity with traditional beliefs. This mainly happens because of a lack proper pastoral training and follow-up, especially in the rural areas.

More Churches in Zimbabwe are now starting to work together to help train more pastors. Churches are also starting to help those suffering as a result of a poor economy.

There is only a few accounts of persecution from families as the government respects religious freedom.

Overview

Previously known as Rhodesia, it was named after Cecil Rhodes. Cecil Rhodes was given a royal Charter in 1888 by Lord Salisbury to create the British South Africa Company (BSAC). Their mandate was to annex and administer territory in Southern Africa.

In 1890 the Union Jack was raised in a new settlement called Salisbury (now Harare). This marked the era of British rule in Zimbabwe. This marked the era of British rule in Zimbabwe which continued until 1965 when Prime Minister Ian Smith announced Unilateral Declaration of Independence from the United Kingdom.

The UK did not accept this act and demanded more complete voting rights for the black African majority in the country, by using economic sanctions as leverage. With sanctions and a guerrilla uprising Zimbabwe finally had its first free elections in 1979 and its total independence in 1980.

This started the era of the ZANU PF led by Pres. Robert Mugabe. In 1997 he started  a land redistribution campaign which caused an exodus of white farmers. Unfortunately training was not given to the new farmers on how to farm. This led to farms not producing enough food. This crippled the economy.

Since then Zimbabwe had 5 election, each of them being disputed. One of them in 2008 led to a power sharing where ZANU PF’s main opposition’s leader Morgan Tsvangirai was inaugurated as prime minister of Zimbabwe. Mugabe was however elected president in June 2013 in balloting that was severely flawed and internationally condemned.

In November 2017 the army took control of Zimbabwe, placing Pres. Robert Mugabe under house arrest

More Resources:

Overview

Previously known as Rhodesia, it was named after Cecil Rhodes. Cecil Rhodes was given a royal Charter in 1888 by Lord Salisbury to create the British South Africa Company (BSAC). Their mandate was to annex and administer territory in Southern Africa.

In 1890 the Union Jack was raised in a new settlement called Salisbury (now Harare). This marked the era of British rule in Zimbabwe. This marked the era of British rule in Zimbabwe which continued until 1965 when Prime Minister Ian Smith announced Unilateral Declaration of Independence from the United Kingdom.

The UK did not accept this act and demanded more complete voting rights for the black African majority in the country, by using economic sanctions as leverage. With sanctions and a guerrilla uprising Zimbabwe finally had its first free elections in 1979 and its total independence in 1980.

This started the era of the ZANU PF led by Pres. Robert Mugabe. In 1997 he started  a land redistribution campaign which caused an exodus of white farmers. Unfortunately training was not given to the new farmers on how to farm. This led to farms not producing enough food. This crippled the economy.

Since then Zimbabwe had 5 election, each of them being disputed. One of them in 2008 led to a power sharing where ZANU PF’s main opposition’s leader Morgan Tsvangirai was inaugurated as prime minister of Zimbabwe. Mugabe was however elected president in June 2013 in balloting that was severely flawed and internationally condemned.

Zimbabwe is currently trying to woo back investors in investing in its mines, agriculture and tourism. Despite the potential which the country has, not many are willing to invest, because of the instability related to the rule of Pres. Robert Mugabe.

More Resources:

Bibliography